Red Admiral

The Red Admiral butterfly is perhaps one of the best known species, even if people haven’t seen the species, most will recognise the name. The species also follows on nicely from our last profile on the Small Tortoiseshell, both of these species (and others which will be mentioned in the coming weeks/months) are part of the Vannesids family.

Red Admiral Butterfly on Bramble - Oisín Duffy

Red Admiral Butterfly on Bramble – Oisín Duffy

The Red Admiral can be found in a wide range of habitats from woodlands to  gardens and even wastegrounds, there’s a good chance you will come across this species during the coming year! It is a migrant species, but within the last five years it has been found to overwinter in Ireland. Identification for this species in Ireland is relatively simple the only species which could possibly cause confusion is the Painted Lady (another member of the Vannesids and another migratory species, but generally rarer).

The butterfly has dark brown velvet like wings with orange banding. On the topside of the forewing the wings darken from brown (closest to the body, up until the orange banding) to a black with minor white marking (small bands and dots). The top side of the hindwings are generally a more uniformed brown colour and are fringed with a thick orange band (with black dots).

Red Admiral Butterfly - Notice the how the wings appear to become darker after the orange banding. - Oisín

Red Admiral Butterfly – Notice the how the wings appear to become darker after the orange banding. – Oisín Duffy

 

The underside of the species is also quite beautiful and interesting, I find the orange band tends to appear more red on the underside and there is also hints of a velvety blue colour which are close to the body.  The white marks on the forewing again appear very distinctive as they contrast with the general dark coloured underside.

Underside of the Red Admiral, you can notice the subtle hint of blue colour here close to the body - Oisín Duffy

Underside of the Red Admiral, you can notice the subtle hint of blue colour here close to the body – Oisín Duffy

The Red Admiral, similarly to the Small Tortoiseshell has Nettle (Urtica Diocia) as its main larval foodplant. This species also creates a web like tent for protection while feeding and can at times appear somewhat similar to larva of the Small Tortoiseshell. Red Admiral larva generally go through a number of colour changes from black to pale green.

 

Quick List – 

Name: Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)

Laraval Foodplant: Nettle (Urtica diocia)

Distribution: Common and Widespread

When: Generally from May right through the season till September. (Since this species has now been found to overwinter in Ireland, you may even come across it earlier or later in the year than listed above).

If anyone out there has any questions or suggestion regarding this piece or maybe regarding future pieces, feel free to get in touch through twitter @OshDuffy. If you enjoy posts and especially images of plants and pollinators, then be sure to follow me on twitter also. Also feel free to check out my own personal blog –  Oisin Duffy Nature Notes

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